Social media knows no age limit these days. From young teens to great-grandparents, logging on to Facebook or LinkedIn is an everyday occurrence. For Georgia residents of any age contemplating divorce, however, that popular activity comes with a warning to be careful with what is posted on social media. It may have a large impact on the outcome of divorce procedures.

What is posted online can be used as evidence, even if the spouses are not following each other on any of the types of media. Pictures taken and posted by mutual friends could give some secrets away. These pictures may show one spouse on lavish trips just after that individual took the non-custodial parent back to court to get more child support because the original amount agreed upon was allegedly not enough to provide for the children. One spouse's pictures posted by friends may show that individual in a new car, bought with money that he or she claimed was not available to pay for alimony.

It is not just social media that can be used in court but also texts and emails. In some cases, a subpoena can be issued for those types of communication and anything of relevance could be used in the divorce case. It is in the best interests of both parties to make sure anything placed on any avenue of electronic communication lines up with any documents or statements given to the court.

Georgia has its own laws on the use of electronic media in a divorce case. These laws can seem very complicated to the average person and may require further research in order to understand. In the end, it is best to keep in mind that information that is communicated electronically is permanent and good judgment should be used in digital exchanges.

Source: Forbes, How Social Media Can Affect Your Divorce, Jeff Landers, Aug. 20, 2013