It seems that more and more people around the country, including in Georgia, are celebrating when a divorce is finalized. In the past, some people saw getting a divorce as an embarrassment, whether from family and friends and the church, who believed in "til death do us part," or from a feeling of failure. These celebrations, whether joyous or subdued, are to help a person put that part of his or her life in the past.

Different people choose to mark this significant event in different ways. As with other types of celebrations, the type of occasion should suit the person having gone through the divorce. Some people choose over the top parties where such acts as the wedding ring being placed in a coffin to writing the vows that had been broken on a piece of paper and burning it, both actions signifying the letting go of the hurtful relationship.

Sometimes, the couple will have an event together to announce the fact that the marriage or relationship is no longer working. Usually most of the close friends and family who were at the wedding are at these events to show the love and support that is often needed during the divorce process. As difficult as it may be, divorce is a legal process and depending on the issues between the two parties, it is sometimes a long one. Some people who have been through a divorce and then hosted these events have felt that it truly has helped them get past so many of the negative feelings that surrounded their breakup.

Georgia couples facing divorce may or may not decide to have any manner of celebration during the transition time from married to single. Once the legal aspects of becoming two single individuals has been resolved and whatever on-going agreements such as spousal or child support have been implemented, some choose to just put the matter behind them. For some however, these celebrations can be used as a way to help them move on. Nevertheless, ensuring a fair and comprehensive settlement is the first order of business.

Source: Toledo Blade, "From celebratory to solemn, events maring divorce, breakup evolving," Roneisha Mullen, June 8, 2013